Group Insurance
Contact Us:
Phone: (610)259-2590
Fax: (610)446-0123
Outside PA: (877)220-1400
Address:
500 W. Township Line Rd
Route #1
Havertown, PA 19083
Email:
William A. Minnis, III
bminnis@minnisgroup.com
Monika Wiacek
monika@minnisgroup.com
William A. Minnis, IV
bill@minnisgroup.com
Click for directions
Group Health Insurance


  • PPO: Preferred Provider Organization
    PPO health plans allow members to see any doctor available in their network area. You do not need a referral under a PPO plan. PPO plans have Out-Of-Network benefits and are the least restrictive type of health insurance plan.
  • HMO: Health Maintenance Organization
    HMOs require a referral from your family doctor or PCP (Primary Care Physician) in order to see a specialist. Members can only see participating HMO doctors "in-network" because there are NO Out-of-Network benefits with HMO plans.
  • HMO: Health Maintenance Organization - Open Access
    HMO Open Access health insurance is similar to an HMO except that No Referral is required to see a specialist. Members can only see participating HMO doctors "in-network" because there are NO Out-of-Network benefits with HMO plans.
  • POS: Point of Service
    Point of Service plans are just like HMOs except they include Out of Network benefits. These benefits have deductible and co-insurance in front of most types of medical services, and limit the amount paid to Providers to their company's Usual, Customary and Reasonable charges.
  • POS: Point of Service - Open Access
    Point of Service Open Access plans are just like Open Access HMOs except they include Out of Network benefits. These benefits have deductible and co-insurance in front of most types of medical services, and limit the amount paid to Providers to their company's Usual, Customary and Reasonable charges.
  • HSA: Health Savings Account
    Health Savings Accounts allow employees to choose a high deductible health insurance plan and then fund that deductible in a separate tax-free savings bank account. They can fund up to 100% of the deductible each year and any unused monies roll over to the following year. This high deductible must be met before any benefits whatsoever can kick-in. You are charged the carrier's Usual Customary and Reasonable amounts for whatever medical services are performed, and this is what goes towards the annual deductible. Premium rates have drastically decreased for these plans over recent years making them much more appealing.
  • HRA: Health Reimbursement Account
    Health Reimbursement Accounts use a deductible and co-insurance also, but the Employer funds some or all of these either internally, or via the carrier. The Employer owns whatever funds may be unused, and it can be used towards next year' plan. Whatever is spent is tax deductible as is the regular premiums. The employees do not own the money in this account! Through our counsel Employers decide how to set up these plans in a cost effective manner to maximize their savings.
  • Temporary Health Plans
    A Temporary Health Plan is for that in-between period of time when you don't have access to true health coverage. It is priced extremely inexpensively because it comes to an abrupt end after 30 days, 6 months, or even up to 1 year. It is used during an Employer's Waiting Period for a new hire, for a child ceasing to be eligible for the parent's group plan, or even during a period of unemployment.
  • Sole Proprietor Plans
    We have access to a "Group" Health insurance plan for a Sole Proprietor and their family which asks no medical questions, nor underwrites. It is true Group coverage with no medical questions.
  • Medicare Plans
    This information is for those who are 65 and over, and continuing to work and earn money. You should not turn to your family or friends for advice on Medicare because everyone has a different situation.
Here are the Rules:
For those working for a company with 20 or more employees - your
Primary insurance is your Company's Medical plan. You only need to accept Medicare Part A, since it is free, and you can turn down Part B, which costs money, until you retire. Your Medicare Part A will be your Secondary insurance, but you basically won't need it at all. As part of your planning for retirement you'll need to apply for Part B right away, and you will have no penalties from Medicare.
If you work for a company that has less than 20 employees - your
Primary insurance will be Medicare. As you turn age 65 you will need to acquire from Medicare Part A and Part B. This Part B will cost you approximately $100 per month. The Employer's Group plan will be your Secondary coverage. This means your Medical Providers will need to send your claims to Medicare for processing first, and then to your Employer's plan, and so whatever Medicare doesn't pay for, your Employer's plan will pick up. Your net will be the same co-pays &/or deductibles you had prior to age 65 from your Employer's plan.
IMPORTANT: It is the insurance carriers that require you to purchase and use Part B since they now will be paying after Medicare pays, and so will be saving money. If someone doesn't have this Part B, the carrier will still process a claim AS IF you did have Medicare, and only pay as Secondary!
You can also choose to switch from your Employer's regular plan, and enroll into a Medicare Supplement of some kind, and still stay on the Employer's plan. Your plan options could be:
  • HMO Plans: called Advantage Plans which completely replaces Medicare entirely
  • PPO Plans: also called Advantage Plans which completely replaces Medicare entirely
  • Supplemental Plans: which work along with Medicare.

  • Some of the above plans include Part D, the prescription drug coverage, or you would have to purchase this separately.
    Your use of prescription drugs is typically the deciding factor whether to switch to some type of Supplement or not. With most of the Part D options, there is a chance you can reach the Gap, or Donut Hole, where coverage is interrupted for prescriptions after a certain level, and for several thousand dollars.